Acquisition for Museum - Vintage Hagoita Set

Acquisition for Museum - Vintage Hagoita Set

Acquired for the National Badminton Museum in 2004 is a vintage Hagoita set. Purchased in America, it came from the estate sale of an American woman who was a school teacher in Japan before World War 2. Both paddles (bats) have painted designs, one paddle being slightly smaller than the other. The set includes three brightly coloured feather shuttlecocks.

The Hagoita bats or paddles were used to play Hanetsuki, using a relatively small shuttlecock (Hane), a Japanese version of Battledore and Shuttlecock, traditionally played on New Year’s Day. It can be played by one or two batspersons who keep hitting and counting. It has been recorded as being played by Japanese royalty about 1433.. A mid 19th century painting in Los Angeles called Women playing with Shuttlecocks and Battledores by the artist Yoshitoshi portrays two Japanese ladies wearing kimonos playing Hanetsuki. During the 19th and 20th century, children joined in playing the game and it became a children’s traditional New Year game. The game is rarely played now, but the equipment is used as decoration while the Hagoita with it’s unusual but constant shape makes it a popular form of Japanese art.

In the collection of pictures in the National Badminton Centre is a black and white line drawing signed by C. Roth 1894. Shuttlecock and Battledore. Two Japanese girls in National Costume playing Hanetsuki which was published in the Illustrated London News, Jan 19th, 1895.

Further reading: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/Rexhaggett/hanetsuk.htm